figures of encapsulation

figures of encapsulation
engraving on kitchen utensils
2017

Women from colonized regions are subject to a double degree of oppression. On one side they are affected by the postcolonial effects of modernism and on the other side they are deprived of the basic human rights in many patriarchal-cultural practices. ‘Figures of Encapsulation’ engages with the oppressed, the forgotten and the taken-for- granted beings—and how I make visible the invisible through my engravings on the kitchen utensils.

I interviewed some women who were closely related to me, especially homemakers, about how they managed their life dedicating to home and family. Most of them submitted that it was normal to act under the ‘head of the family’: To an extent that, the utensils in the kitchen which only the women used to cook, have the initials of the ‘head of the family’ (that is the man of the family) engraved on them. This practice raised many questions about gender equality and the politics in the domestic spaces. I collected some vessels from these women to engrave their laborious act by addressing this issue in the larger context of the society. The drawings explore the organic forms that echo within the female body and mind, and also the forms of a seed that give birth. Through this work I perform labor by engraving lines repeatedly to fill the form, besides tolerating the screaming noise caused by the clash of the two metals during the process. The material intensifies the experience further due to the reflective surface of the utensils, that I see myself while creating a mark. On the other hand, I see two tips of the engraver—one real and one virtual, conceptually depicting how women suppressed their own identities, and how using these femininely marked utensils in the kitchen act as a point of realization for them to fight for their own rights.